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The Sailweaver's Son

Review

The Sailweaver's Son

In Etherium, a land above the clouds, 15-year-old Taktinius Spinner, the son of a recognized sail spinner, rescues a survivor of a ship explosion caused by mysterious flammable gas bubbles. News of the rescue spreads quickly. Some start to accuse Tak of treason while his father grounds him for his recklessness. As another attack strikes fear into the hearts of the people, they suspect this is the work of the Gublins, his people’s sworn enemy. To clear his name and solve the mystery of the gas bubbles, Tak sets off on a journey to Gublin territory, risking his life.

"THE SAILWEAVER’S SON creates an innovative, steampunk, fantastical world that relates to Earth in many ways."

Although the idea of airships has been reused throughout other fantasy novels, the people of Etherium have a distinctive culture on how much they value this form of transportation. THE SAILWEAVER’S SON creates an innovative, steampunk, fantastical world that relates to Earth in many ways. Etherium is divided with a diversity of species and territories split up by different rulers. Creatures have evolved and taken to the sky, such as giant jellyfish or stingrays. Even so, the dreamlike environment is, in certain aspects, believable; the story intertwines actual science with magic that astounds.

In this traditional fantasy tale, childhood imaginations come to life with supernatural beasts and magic scattered throughout. However, at some points, the story was hard to take seriously, especially with the Gublins, which suggests a lack of creativity in the name, and in some of the creatures created. Also, I couldn’t quite imagine myself in Etherium because of its lack in background information.

Overall, THE SAILWEAVER’S SON is on par with other fantasy novels. The book managed to keep my attention throughout with the magical atmosphere and enchanting characters.

Reviewed by Jeremy H., Teen Board Member on October 13, 2016

The Sailweaver's Son
by Jeff Minerd