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The Girl from Everywhere

Review

The Girl from Everywhere

For Nix’s entire life, she has not only sailed the seas, but time and space itself. Along with her father and the crew of his ship, they can travel to any real or fictional world as long as they have a hand-drawn map of the place and time. Unfortunately, there is a catch. A map can only take you to a place once. But in this life of adventure and excitement, Nix’s father, Slate, only wants to go back to one place: Honolulu 1868. That was the time and place that Nix’s mother died and Slate wants to have her back again. Over the years, Nix has grown accustomed to her father’s obsession and her doubts that he will ever succeed --- until one day Slate finally gets the right map. Nix worries about whether or not she will exist in this new reality with her mother, but is forced to help her father no matter the cost.

My biggest problem with THE GIRL FROM EVERYWHERE was the start of it. At the beginning of the book, I thought the plot moved along slowly and I was eagerly waiting for it to pick up the pace. Eventually, the plot began to thicken and grow more interesting as I read on. Luckily, there were lots of other things I enjoyed while reading this book. The summary of the book that I read mislead me so I thought I had an idea of what would happen, but as I kept reading, I realized I was completely wrong. While with some books I would be disappointed in this, but THE GIRL FROM EVERYWHERE surprised me, making me love it even more.

It was refreshing to read a story without a romantic relationship being a major plot point...THE GIRL FROM EVERYWHERE was a powerful book with beautiful writing. The epic journey Nix takes is worth the read....

Given that it is about time travel, this book has many different settings. The author describes each setting with rich details, especially Honolulu, Hawaii. As I read about secret waterfalls and bustling towns in Hawaii, it only made my feeling of wanderlust grow. I wanted to go to Hawaii before reading this book, but now my desire has increased.

Another aspect I loved were the characters. Maxwell crafted an excellent and diverse cast of characters. Every single character was fun to read about and had an interesting backstory. I especially loved the main character, Nix. Nix is strong, clever, and loves to read, which is always an extra plus. Her strained relationship with her father made me feel plenty of sympathy for her, and her friendship with one of the crew members, Kashmir, was great to watch.

One of my favorite things about the book was that the story did not make romance one of the big components of the plot, but instead had very little of it. Trust me, I love a good romance but it was refreshing to read a story without a romantic relationship being a major plot point. The other time travel books I’ve read were more centered around romance while this one centered around family and home. Though, if you always want to read a book with a love story, there is a small romance in this, which is very enjoyable.

THE GIRL FROM EVERYWHERE was a powerful book with beautiful writing. The epic journey Nix takes is worth the read and the author manages to explain all of the rules of time travel without having a huge information dump. The end left me on the edge of my seat and craving more, so I was thrilled to find out this is only the first book of a duology. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoyed Alexandra Bracken’s PASSENGER or to anyone that wants to read books about time travel but doesn’t know where to begin.

Reviewed by Brynn S., Teen Board Member on March 2, 2016

The Girl from Everywhere
(The Girl from Everywhere #1)
by Heidi Heilig