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Dotwav

Review

Dotwav

Ani Lee wants what every other 15-year-old girl wants: a normal life, with good friends and a happy family. But that’s not quite possible if you’re a prodigious hacker with a habit of breaking into all the wrong places for all the right reasons. One day, a pair of armed men break into her apartment, coming after her for something she didn’t even hack: a .wav file, that behaves abnormally, with aggressive tendencies impossible for it to have.

"Lancaster winds sci-fi and comprehensible science into a tale like no other. The chilling prospect of being taken over by alien forces is magnified by the ideas formed in the description of them."

Joe Dyson is a member of the British Intelligence, part of the specialized teen division known as YETI. As a test subject for advanced technology, Joe uses his age to act like an innocent teenager to solve cases impossible for older agents. After a tragic incident, Joe takes a break from the secret life. But when his friend goes missing, Joe begins search into a mysterious music group that is more than meets the eye, or rather, the ear.

Their missions collide as the two learn that sound is not always as it seems, as it takes over the minds of teens. Someone --- or something --- is using music and the .wav file to turn humans into a terror that may take over the world as they know it.

Lancaster winds sci-fi and comprehensible science into a tale like no other. The chilling prospect of being taken over by alien forces is magnified by the ideas formed in the description of them. Aliens are always seen as strange, but still vaguely Earth-like, but DOTWAV lights the thought of outsiders like nothing ever imagined by anyone. All of the ideas are backed by carefully manipulated fact, that makes it seem like something that could actually happen. I loved the science behind everything, but others may find it a little boring, albeit it all being useful to the understanding of the novel.

Ani and Joe provide characters that are lovably flawed, like all humans. Ani has a brilliant mind competing with a dark past, that allows her to be relatable in many aspects. Joe is incredible in field work that made my inner secret agent want to sing. His anger management issues provide a solid connection from the distant thought of government intelligence, to an everyday teenager. At times, Lancaster focused more on the plot behind the novel, leading the characters to become a bit detached from their humanity, as they jumped from one mind-numbing scene to the next.

Overall, DOTWAV was an amazing read. What I initially thought of as a spy book took turned into something I never imagined. It is one of those books that is best read spread out so that everything that occurs can be fully digested before proceeding. Not only the two main characters Joe and Ani, but every person has something unique about them that adds to the complexity of the story.

In a world of lies and impossibility, information is the only tool powerful enough to stop a bombardment of sound that could mean loss of control for the planet, forever.

Reviewed by Caitlyn K., Teen Board Member on October 23, 2016

Dotwav
by Mike A. Lancaster