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All Rivers Flow to the Sea

Review

All Rivers Flow to the Sea

Seventeen-year-old Rose Latham realizes that the world has changed around her, but she continues to be haunted by the tragic accident in the Adirondacks that has left her once vibrant older sister, Ivy, in a coma and her family's life in fragments.

It has been a month since that winter night, and each afternoon Rose goes to visit her sister at the Rosewood Convalescent Home with their kind, spirited neighbor William T. Each day her emotionally distant mother works on the assembly line at the Utica Club Brewery and each night passes the time making potholders, but she has not seen her helpless elder daughter --- much to her younger daughter's frustration.

Meanwhile, Rose deals with high school, the whispers about her sister, and the series of boys Rose meets at the town's gorge at night who don't really care about Rose much the same way she does them. It's not until she receives help from childhood friend Tom Miller that Rose realizes she must look to herself to quell the river of emotional turmoil that rages through her and in time begin to move on to a new life without her sister.

ALL RIVERS FLOW TO THE SEA is a haunting story that shows the complexity of a family's grief and love as they face the loss of a loved one. While the alternating scenes between past and present may be a bit tedious and confusing at times, overall the novel is worth reading.

Reviewed by Sarah Sawtelle on October 11, 2005

All Rivers Flow to the Sea
by Alison McGhee

  • Publication Date: May 8, 2007
  • Genres: Fiction
  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick
  • ISBN-10: 0763633720
  • ISBN-13: 9780763633721