Skip to main content

A Room on Lorelei Street

Review

A Room on Lorelei Street

Secrets can hurt, and Zoe Beth Buckman and her family have way too many of them.

When Zoe's father died, her family fell apart. Her little brother, more hers than either of her parents', was sent to live with her aunt and uncle. Now, her mother drinks too much and doesn't go to work when she says she will. Zoe, straining from the effort of keeping the household together and waitressing to make ends meet, acts out in class. She realizes, though the decision is anything but easy, that she must have a room of her own if she wants to regain control of her life.

The answer to her needs comes in the form of a room at 373 Lorelei Street. Opal Keats, in order to make ends meet and pay her taxes, rents a room to Zoe. In Opal, Zoe finds an ally, someone who has seen much of the past but always looks to the future. Zoe swears she'll never return to her mother's house and the life she left. But when expenses are high and her only income comes from waitressing at a diner, she knows she might have to go to an extreme or two in order to keep her room.

With strength, resolve, and a little help from an old woman with a big dog, Zoe tackles her problems one by one. Even though there are no happy endings, Zoe is able to overcome her family's troubles as well as her own, and the reader can feel all of her frustration, love, sadness and determination.

Reviewed by Carlie Webber on June 1, 2005

A Room on Lorelei Street
by Mary E. Pearson

  • Publication Date: June 1, 2005
  • Genres: Fiction
  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • ISBN-10: 0805076670
  • ISBN-13: 9780805076677