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Teen Board member Alison S. recently had the fun idea to review 20 short stories for Teenreads, in addition to her usual monthly reviews. Except, keeping social media in mind, she kept her reviews very short --- and by "short" we mean 140 characters. In the length of just one tweet, Alison sums up some fantastic literary short stories from big name authors such as Neil Gaiman and Margaret Atwood. Of course, art always requires a little sacrifice, so if you see what looks like a typo, don't worry, it was all intentional. These reviews will have you laughing in no time --- and, if you'd like to try your own 140 character review, Alison has included links to free versions of the stories when possible!

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While plenty of books are wholly original, no one can claim that literature is immune to trends. TWILIGHT set off an entire slew of vampire titles, and dystopians flooded the young adult market for years. In 2015, books featuring protagonists with mental health issues have dominated the YA scene.
 
In this blog series, Teen Board member Alison S. takes a look at another trend that continues to stay strong in adult and YA literature alike --- fairy tale adaptations. Her first post discussed Gregory Maguire’s CONFESSIONS OF AN UGLY STEPSISTER. Her second post, below, covers Janette Rallison's MY FAIR GODMOTHER.
 
 

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When a stranger appeared at Meg Murry’s door on a dark and stormy night, her entire life changed. In turn, Madeleine L’Engle’s 1963 classic A WRINKLE IN TIME changed thousands of readers' of lives, as well.

Praised for its fantastical plot, rife with tesseracts and the lovable Mrs. W's, its realistic characters and its delicate balance of whimsy and heart, A WRINKLE OF TIME is not free from criticism. It comes in at #90 on the American Library Association’s 2000-2009 list of Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books and has been cited for everything from offensive language to “Satanic undertones.”

Below, YA author Leila Sales (THIS SONG WILL SAVE YOUR LIFE, TONIGHT THE STREETS ARE OURS) and Teen Board member Alison S. challenge the challengers, explaining why they love A WRINKLE IN TIME and would recommend it to readers everywhere.


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While plenty of books are wholly original, no one can claim that literature is immune to trends. TWILIGHT set off an entire slew of vampire titles, and dystopians flooded the young adult market for years. In 2015, books featuring protagonists with mental health issues have dominated the YA scene.

In this blog series, Teen Board member Alison S. takes a look at another trend that continues to stay strong in adult and YA literature alike --- fairy tale adaptations. See her first post, below, focusing on Gregory Maguire’s CONFESSIONS OF AN UGLY STEPSISTER!


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At Teenreads, we love to review the latest and greatest YA books to hit the shelves. However, we recognize that older books --- sometimes much older books --- have plenty of value, too. In this blog series, Teen Board member Alison S. is writing about some of her favorites and how they remain relevant today. Read below for her fifth post on THE CALL OF THE WILD.  You can also read her earlier posts on FRANKENSTEIN, THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, THE HITCHKIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES.


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Teen Board member Alison S. has been tackling the classics for a while now, blogging about the literary merits, nuances and modern relevance of SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, FRANKENSTEIN, THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY.
 
In this "sub-blog series," though, she's going to dig into one of the great controversies of modern literature --- the fact that Sir Conan Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes only to bring him back seven years later "for no ostensible reason." She's already analyzed THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES --- the first novel in which Holmes mystically reappears --- and BASKERVILLE, a novel in which author John O'Connell delves into Doyle's possible motivation. In her final blog post in the series, below, she takes on Graham Moore's THE SHERLOCKIAN and wraps up her take on the mystery. Read it, now!
 

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Teen Board member Alison S. has been tackling the classics for a while now, blogging about the literary merits, nuances and modern relevance of SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, FRANKENSTEIN, THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and THE PORTRAIT OF DORIAN GRAY.

In this "sub-blog series," though, she's going to dig into one of the great controversies of modern literature --- the fact that Sir Conan Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes only to bring him back seven years later "for no ostensible reason." In her first post, she looked at the the first novel in which Holmes mystically reappears --- THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES . This post tackles BASKERVILLE, a novel in which author John O'Connell delves into Doyle's possible motivation.


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Teen Board member Alison S. has been tackling the classics for a while now, blogging about the literary merits, nuances and modern relevance of SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, FRANKENSTEIN, THE HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY and THE PORTRAIT OF DORIAN GRAY. In this "sub-blog series," though, she's going to dig into one of the great controversies of modern literature --- the fact that Sir Conan Doyle killed off Sherlock Holmes only to bring him back seven years later "for no ostensible reason." In this post, she looks at the the first novel in which Holmes mystically reappears --- THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES --- and in future posts, will talk about the different theories behind Doyle's mysterious choice. 


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At Teenreads, we love to review the latest and greatest YA books to hit the shelves. However, we recognize that older books --- sometimes much older books --- have plenty of value, too. In this blog series, Teen Board member Alison S. is writing about some of her favorites and how they remain relevant today. Read below for her fourth post about SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES by Ray Bradbury. You can also read her earlier posts on THE HITCHKIKER'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY, FRANKENSTEIN and THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY.


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There are few things that elicit more dread in a high school student's mind than the words "college applications." The agonizing decisions of where to apply, the endless streams of essays asking you to describe every last particle of your accomplishments and your character and confusing financial aid forms. 

Teen Board member (and high school junior) Alison S. can relate --- and for this reason, decided to read the adult satire EARLY DECISION for a little bit of light-hearted fare on a semi-daunting topic. However, the book turned out to be a bit different than she expected. Read her thoughts below --- and if you're just starting the college application process, you might decide to pick it up for yourself!


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