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Renée Watson

Biography

Renée Watson

Renée Watson is the acclaimed author of the teen novel, THIS SIDE OF HOME, and two picture books: HARLEM'S LITTLE BLACKBIRD and A PLACE WHERE HURRICANES HAPPEN, which was featured on NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams. Her middle grade novel, WHAT MAMMALEFT ME debuted as an ABA New Voices Pick. She lives in New York City.
www.reneewatson.net
@harlemportland (Instagram)

Renée Watson

Books by Renée Watson

by Renée Watson and Ellen Hagan - Contemporary Fiction, Fiction, Friendship, Prejudice , Racism, Social Issues, Women’s Issues, Young Adult 13+

Jasmine and Chelsea are best friends on a mission. They're sick of the way women are treated even at their progressive NYC high school, so they decide to start a Women's Rights Club. They post their work online --- poems, essays, videos of Chelsea performing her poetry and Jasmine's response to the racial microaggressions she experiences --- and they go viral. But the club is also targeted by trolls. When things escalate in real life, the principal shuts the club down. Not willing to be silenced, Jasmine and Chelsea risk everything for their voices --- and those of other women --- to be heard.

by Renée Watson - Family, Fiction, Friendship

Serenity is good at keeping secrets, and she's got a whole lifetime's worth of them. Her mother is dead, her father is gone, and starting life over at her grandparents' house is strange. Luckily, certain things seem to hold promise: a new friend who makes her feel connected, and a boy who makes her feel seen. But when her brother starts making poor choices, her friend is keeping her own dangerous secret, and her grandparents put all of their trust in a faith that Serenity isn't sure she understands, it is the power of love that will repair her heart and keep her sure of just who she is.

by Renée Watson - African American Interest, Fiction, Prejudice , Social Issues, Young Adult 14+

Jade believes she must get out of her poor neighborhood if she's ever going to succeed. Her mother tells her to take advantage of every opportunity that comes her way. And Jade has: every day she rides the bus away from her friends and to the private school where she feels like an outsider, but where she has plenty of opportunities. But some opportunities she doesn't really welcome, like an invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for "at-risk" girls. Just because her mentor is black and graduated from the same high school doesn't mean she understands where Jade is coming from.

by Renée Watson - African American Interest, Family, Fiction, Prejudice , Young Adult 14+
Maya Younger and her identical twin sister, Nikki, have always agreed on the important things. They even plan to attend the same historically African American college. But nothing can always remain the same. As their Portland neighborhood goes from rough-and-tumble to up-and-coming, Maya feels her connection to Nikki and their community slipping away. Nikki spends more time at trendy coffee shops than backyard barbecues, and their new high school principal is more committed to erasing the neighborhood's "ghetto" reputation than honoring its history. Home doesn't feel like home anymore. 
 
But nothing can always remain the same.
 
As their Portland neighborhood goes from rough-and-tumble to up-and-coming, Maya feels her connection to Nikki and their community slipping away. Nikki spends more time at trendy coffee shops than backyard barbecues, and their new high school principal is more committed to erasing the neighborhood's "ghetto" reputation than honoring its history. Home doesn't feel like home anymore. As Maya struggles to hold on to her black heritage, she begins to wonder with whom --- or where --- she belongs. Does growing up have to mean growing apart?
Maya Younger and her identical twin sister, Nikki, have always agreed on the important things. Friends. Boys. School. They even plan to attend the same historically African American college.
But nothing can always remain the same.
 
As their Portland neighborhood goes from rough-and-tumble to up-and-coming, Maya feels her connection to Nikki and their community slipping away. Nikki spends more time at trendy coffee shops than backyard barbecues, and their new high school principal is more committed to erasing the neighborhood's "ghetto" reputation than honoring its history. Home doesn't feel like home anymore. As Maya struggles to hold on to her black heritage, she begins to wonder with whom --- or where --- she belongs. Does growing up have to mean growing apart?
Maya Younger and her identical twin sister, Nikki, have always agreed on the important things. Friends. Boys. School. They even plan to attend the same historically African American college.
But nothing can always remain the same.
 
As their Portland neighborhood goes from rough-and-tumble to up-and-coming, Maya feels her connection to Nikki and their community slipping away. Nikki spends more time at trendy coffee shops than backyard barbecues, and their new high school principal is more committed to erasing the neighborhood's "ghetto" reputation than honoring its history. Home doesn't feel like home anymore. As Maya struggles to hold on to her black heritage, she begins to wonder with whom --- or where --- she belongs. Does growing up have to mean growing apart?