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R. Gregory Christie

Biography

R. Gregory Christie

R. Gregory Christie is a three-time recipient of a Coretta Scott King Honor Award in Illustration. His picture book, BAD NEWS FOR OUTLAWS: THE REMARKABLE LIFE OF BASS REEVES, DEPUTY U. S. MARSHAL recently won the Coretta Scott King Award in writing for 2010. Two of his books, ONLY PASSING THROUGH and STARS IN DARKNESS have been included in the New York Times’ 10 Best-Illustrated Children’s Books Award. YESTERDAY I HAD THE BLUES featured on PBS’ television show, Between the Lions, displayed his art to a Jazzy soundtrack. “Garrett’s Gift “an animated short movie narrated by actress Queen Latifah and written by Karyn Parsons is often featured on HBO Kids.

He is presently traveling around the country on a “working tour,” doing school visits by day and painting at night. To date he has illustrated over twenty-five children’s books.

R. Gregory Christie

Books by R. Gregory Christie

by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and R. Gregory Christie - Fiction, Historical Fiction, Young Adult 12+

Lewis Michaux was born to do things his own way. When a white banker told him to sell fried chicken, not books, because Negroes don't read, Lewis took five books and $100 and built a bookstore. It soon became the intellectual center of Harlem, a refuge for everyone from Muhammad Ali to Malcolm X. In NO CRYSTAL STAIR, Vaunda Micheaux Nelson document the life and times of her great uncle, an extraordinary literacy pioneer of the Civil Rights era.

Written by Carole Boston Weatherford with illustrations by R. Gregory Christie - Children's Nonfiction, History, Human Rights, Prejudice , Racism

As slaves relentlessly toiled in an unjust system in 19th century Louisiana, they all counted down the days until Sunday, when at least for half a day they were briefly able to congregate in Congo Square in New Orleans. Here they were free to set up an open market, sing, dance and play music. They were free to forget their cares, their struggles and their oppression. This story chronicles slaves' duties each day, from chopping logs on Mondays to baking bread on Wednesdays to plucking hens on Saturday, and builds to the freedom of Sundays and the special experience of an afternoon spent in Congo Square.